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时间:2020-05-25 11:07:51 作者:金融界 浏览量:37027

AG88导航网【ag88.shop】申博体育 1bFbr9tn】Javi\er Bar\dem t【akes over Times Square\ 【to demand ocean protections/720v

LoanText sizeAaAaMagda【le\na【 Herrera, director of pho】\tog/raphy at】 G/EO】 magazine, has a 【weal】th of exper【ienc【e in t\【he wor\ld o\/f photography and journalism, an/d a keen eye for an am【\azin\g image. /This made h/e/r id【eally place【d for her a【ppoin/tment as a judge for】\ th【e 2019 Eu\r【op】ean Wildlife Photographer o】f the Y\ear】./The competition, run annually b\y the So】ciety of German Nature Photographers and now\】 in its 19th year, challenges profession\al and no/n【-professional photo【graphers】 alike to 【provide th】e bes/t photograp/hy Europe has to offer/.Herrera too【k/ some time【 to talk t\o us ab】out the com/petition, what to exp】ec/t,【 and how photographers, a【s well as providin\g b\reathta【【kin【g image\s,】 can help drive positive engage\ment w//【ith t\he envir】onment.【Congratu\/lation】s on your ap【po】intment\ to t\he judging pa\nel for the GDT European Nature photographer of t】he Year 2019. How did you beco】me involved wit【h th】】is 【\co\mpe】tition】?&ldqu\o;I t】】hin/k some of the p】hotographers I wo/r/k\ with\ at Geo ha/ve】 s【uggest【ed that I partic】ipa】te. Geo is a magazine that 【is concer】ned with the 【en/vir/onment, nature /a【nd\ wildlife con【serva\tion.&rdquo\;Salvad】or Colvee【, Nebot Der/ Tanz 】D【es Okt【o【pus】W】hy 】do 】yo\u thin/k competitions such/ as this a\re i】mportant?“N】/【a】tu\re a】nd wildlife ph【otography is becoming increasingly po\pular. P【ho【tographers 【are our am/bassador\s an\d our eyes an\d these e】vents allow u】s 【to make the object of t【heir w/o/rk known/ to the widest possible 【au\dience. Tod/ay, it i】s/ important to highligh【t the natural beauty o/f o【ur pl/anet but /also t】/he dang\ers. /It/'s not just about beautifu\l p\ic/【ture】s.”H】ave you seen /many of the entries 】yet? What i/s the standard lik】e so far?“As far as I【 can se】e the standard is high!”Is】 there an【ything in particular you’】r【e hoping to s/ee in this year’s 【entri/es?“I hope /】to see, as wit\h any photo, something that sho/ws com/plexity or tension, behaviour, activity a\nd threat too.&rdqu/o;Is there a cat【egory that you particula\rly appreciat\e or enjoy?“I have to say, I love all of the】m\ \but I am 】part【icularly intere】sted in the 】K7 \one (the one that focuses o】n the beneficial or】 n【\egative rel【ationsh】ip /bet【ween humans /and nature).【Cristobal【 Serran\o, Der PoolWhy do/ you /th【i/nk it is \important 】for the competition to exp【lore this particul【ar topic?“It is important not t【o separate /the animal fro\m the human and to sh/ow th【【is relations】hi】p, which\ can /be de】structive (o\n\ the part of humans). W【e share a p【lanet where everyone must find t【heir 【place.&rdqu【o;To what ex/tent is nature photo\graphy a\ble to re/flect on the【 efforts of c\onservation 】a】nd/or reveal\ what/ more nee【ds to be done?】 Wha/t【 are its limi\ta】tions?“Nature photogr\ap/hy sho/ws us 【an ov【e】rview of the situati【on, s】/ometimes in a very aesthetic form, but in recent【 years/ it has evolved 【into\ a photography t\hat r/evea】ls【 a context \that, 【like any】 documen/tary photography, explores th】e re/lations/hip of the living to a territ//ory. In this se】nse/, it s】trongly【 concerns us all.”/W/ords: Dan【ny \McCanceHeader: Joel Brunet, Ein /Gemaelde d【es LebensShare this artic\le 【 More fr【om placesHuUi

83N3T/ake a\】 l【ook 】at】【 the plastics o/f the f/utureIQwf0IcS

JITbHow smal/l scale fisher【ies sa】ved/ Danish f\ishing c\ommunitiesrnpP

GFk1What is Earth Day/? | Euronew【s answersUlFB

59KdText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesc77K

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hVOpOur s【eas a】re 【facing increasi】ng competition for spa/ce and reso/urces — between o\ld sectors, su【】c\h as fishing, and new, such as offshore wind farms.\T/his compe【tit】ion can\ lea】d to \c】onfl/icts.\ Uncoordin\at【ed use of marine space al/so【 threatens the he】alth of the oc【ean, adding to\【 the destructive \effects of c】limate/ c】hange.P/rote【cting the ma\r【ine e/nvironment, re/d/ucing conflicts and e\ncouraging investment are t【】he aims of maritime 【spatial planning【, or/ MSP &m【dash; a proce/\ss th/a【t puts economic ac\tiv\ities and ecosystems on a map. Aut\horities \and stakeholders work together, developing plans at local, national an【d t\rans\national levels.It’s /essent/ial that different economic \sec/tors, a\gencies a【nd governments cooperate fo】r the proces\s to 【/be】 successful. The European Commission and IOC-UNESC\O ar】e d\evelop】ing int【ernati【onal gu/idelines to promote m/ari\time spatial】 plann/ing around the world.The】 goal /is to trip】le the marine a】re【\a benef【iting f【rom MSP by】 】2030, covering【 30 per cent of m\aritim\e area/s under【 national j】urisdiction.Shar】e this 】articleShareTweetShare】send】S/hareTweetSharese【ndM【oreHideShareSendShareShareShareSen】dShareShare/More a\b【outOceanEnvironmental /protec/\tionFish\eryPortugal360° vi】deo \ Most viewe/【d \ 【】 / 】 / What influence on climate i】s】 the coronavirus lockdown r/eally having? 【 / 【The\ new AI system 】safeguarding \【premature bab【ies from/ /i\nfecti/\on / 】 // / / Messenge\r【 RNA:\ the molecule that may teach our bodies 【\t】o beat cancer\ 】 【 / Ap【ple and Google sa】y they'/【;ll work \together to trace sprea\d of coro/navirus via sm\ar】t【phones / / 【 How EU funding is changin/g the face \of L/atvian\ innovatio/n】 】 】 \ Browse to\day's t】agsgLMl

9iTpA/ "monster fatberg," consisting of eve\rythi\ng that shou】ldn't\ 【have /been flu【shed 】down a】】 toilet or poured d【\own a \si\nk, has【 been d【isc】overed/ in Devon, E\n\gland.South We/st /Water (SWW) says the berg【, which\ i/s belie/】ved to the larg\est e【ver found in\ Devon, is\ 64 m【etres in length.To pu【t this into perspective, 【it /is 7 metres lon/ger than the height 【of Italy's Leaning Tower /of P】】isa,【 1【2 】metres longer than the he】ight of/ Nelson【's\ Colum【n in London, 【and 1】7\ metres【 lo】nger t/ha】n the \hei\ght of P/aris【'【 //Arc de Triomphe.It is 【f\ormed of ma\/ny\ wa【\ste 】products, including】 wet wipes, co【ngea/led fat, oil and grease inside the sewer.An【d the/ 【remov】al process isn't expected to be s/imple."This is g/oing t\o t/ake us several weeks to remove," SWW's Director of Wastewater Andrew Roantree said/ 】in a vi】deo \stat【/em/ent \on Twitter."I】t will b/e a difficult/ exercise for our guys, and we ne/ed to】 \do/ it to protect【 the bath【ing wat【er [on the c】oast]."Work to remove the /fatber\g is due to begin on F/ebr/uary 4, /where sew】er 】w【orker\s 】will【 use hig/h-pressure j\et【s, shovels, pi】ckax\es and speci/alist equipment to tac】kle】 the m\onster b【it by bit.The】】se sewer blockag【es costs customers &p】o/und;4】.5 mi【llion a yea【r," South Wes\t Wat/【er w/arne\d."Every ti/me a wet wipe is/ flushed or oil p/oured 【down the】 drain, \there i\s a risk these it【ems【 could \c\ause sewer blockages. This i/s【 extremely unpleasant and could happen in your own home."London '/b\erg'\However, Devon's discovery \is still no 】m【atch for the enormous 250 metre【-lon【g fatberg found in London's sewe】r system i】n 2017.Small p【ar/ts of this chunk o/f waste were later exhibited at the Mu/seum of London,/ while the rest was rec/ycl\ed as bio【fuel to power Lond】on's bus network.REA】D MORE:【/ "BI【N it, don't 【BLOCK】 it!" -】 Monster 'fatber/g' is foun/d in London\ sewerREAD MORE: London】's 'fatberg' moves fro\m sewer/ /to museumShare th】is art\icleCopy/past\e the ar【t\icle video embed link below:CopyShareTweetShare】sendShareTweetShar\esend【MoreHideShareSendSh\areShareShare【SendShareShareYou might al【so like 】 】 】】 \ A circular economy is within \reach if Eu\rop】/ean busines/ses grasp the opportunity ǀ V\iew / \ \ 】 】 】 \ 【 Th】e Ugandan/ singer /tu【rning plastic waste int】o d【rums \ 】 \】 【 Our d\【isposable culture must 【end. We need t/he ‘right to repair’【 not/ recycle our s【martphones】 ǀ】】 Vi\ew More a\boutwastewast\e disposalEnvir/onm/entEnvironmental protection 【 】 Brow/se today&\#0【39\;s tagslZ5O

4EpC【Szi】get m】us\ic fe【【st】ival in Hungary/ sh】owcases its gre】en /c/\redentials4kem

bLX3Nur/s/e/ry school children in the U】nited Ara【/b \Emirates are】 learning e【arly】 about 【the 【importanc\e of recycling leftove】r food\.Li】tt【le 】ones at the Kids Worl\【d \Nursery in 】Dubai】 are ge】tti【ng their h\ands di/rty【 an/d fee/ling the【 diff【erence 】bet】ween green waste, like apples and 【onions, and brown waste which inclu【des leaves and twi【gs.UAE children learn about com【postingAfter 45 days, using worms to create comp\ost fro【m food wa/s】te, the children】 use the enri\che【d mat】er\i】al t】o n】ourish pl/ants in \the nursery’s garden. Once fertilized, the cycl\e starts again.Thr【ee-and-a-half-y/ear\-old \Ja【x V】/an Dyk used the compost 【he an【d his /\class】m【ates m/a】de to feed h/is chili pepper pla/nt. Duri】ng the process, he le【arned an import】ant lesson.“Comp/\ost makes soil and soil make【s p】lants g\row,&\rdquo; he proudly states.Through hands-on learning, 【/nursery】 】children can establish sustainabl\e, lifelong habits, says the nursery’s fou\nder, Lovita/ Ta\riq.An【 impor【tant /question fo/r the kids is【, ‘Why do we recycle?’&\ldquo;We tell th\em wh】at wil/l happen if we don&rs【quo;t d\o these thin\g【s, whilst showi\ng the】m small videos on what’s goi】ng t】o happen i【f the/ world becomes hotter - ho\w t\h/e a】nimals are goi【ng 【to have probl】ems,” she explains.UAE children learn about compostingTHE \AI ANSWER/ 【TO 【F\OOD WASTEFood【 waste costs t】he UAE a【n estimated 3.5 billio】n dollars (3.1\ billion Euros) per year a/cc【or/ding to the Ministry /of /Climate Change and Environment.By 2030\, the coun/\try is pledging to slash food wa】ste in half. A【 national】 】milestone\ ca/me in 28【, when the UAE was able to conserve/ the equiv】alent】 of more than one 】million meals.Pa\rt of it/】s /action plan to tackle the food waste issue 】is【】 t【o look to technology companies for innovative answ】er\s.For\ /example, in //【a bid t【o help global F\&【B bu】sine/sses, London-based】】 start-up Winnow Solutions】 /【is\【 /using a/rtific【ia\l int【elligence to scan and identify /excess wast/e with 】cameras.A/n A】I solution to food wast【e, scans and identifies /e】x【ces/【s waste wi/th camerasThis can, they say, /preven/t/ up to 70 perce/nt of foo】d waste in the firs【t】 year 】of【 】use.Key con【tributors to the Middle】 East【【 regio\n【&rsq【uo;s food \waste prob/l】em are large】 /buffet-style dining】 operations and a culture of gener\ous hospitality,【 say/s Ignacio /Ram】irez, the company’s MENA\/ director.【&ldquo/;In this】 region, cult\urally speaking, 】people \wan【/t th\eir guest to always\ h】ave /eno】ugh【, but it do】esn’t m\ean the\y want to produc\e too much,” h【e expla】ins, adding t【ha\t most food】 wast/ed\】 gl/obally is throw/n \out before 【it reaches people&【rsquo;s p\lates/.Ignaci】o Ramir/ez speaks t/\o Euronews’ \Sali/m/ EssaidWA【】S】TE, LANDFILLS & GLOBA\L \WARMINGMo\re \than one-third of the 【world’s food,/ a/mounting to ar【ound a bill【ion tons, ha】s been wasted yearl】y since 2011, accor【ding to t/he U\nited N/at\ions.In 【landfills/, w【a/ste\d food pro/du/ces nearly 10 p/ercent【】 of the world&rs【quo;s greenhous\e gasses, /affecting glo\bal warming.Exce/ss fo/od waste prod【uc\es【 10 \percent of【 the w\or/ld&】r【squo;s greenhouse gasses\The World Wildlife Fu/nd attributes food w】aste as the】 main 【【cause of deforestation an【d【 the l\oss of w【ater s/】ources worldwide due】 t/o rising food dema\nd/ a】nd consumption, 【and also the conve/rs【ion of forests t\o farmland and ranch land.Gulf Arab co【/untries ha\ve some o】【f the l【argest amounts o【f food wa【/ste, 】ac\co/rd\in】g to the e】/nvironmental service /p\rovider Dubai Carbon.Th\e UAE is \among the top waste generators in th】e w\orld, disposing of an e【stimated 2.7】 kilog】rams of food per person dai\l【y, whi【ch 】is more than d】ouble the rate of Europe, re\ports the agency\.SEEN】 ON 【S】OCIAL MED】IA: 】SUSTA/I\NABLE GROWTHTh/e R\【EEM Pro\gram in Bahr】ain wishes】】 to inspire &l\dquo;little environm】ental【 leaders,” sharing this post of a tree pla【nting /w/ork\shop for ch/i【】ldren. View this post on Instag\r/am#&/#【1576;ر&【#1606;】75;مج_ي&\#15;_/604;&】#/1602;&/#1575;ž/3;ة_】/البيئ&【#77;_】75; 【4;】589;غا】;ر ¡】0;\شاUك في ف/593;&/#1575;&\#1604【;ية【 【#Lيد】10;_【;زUع】; في #ج 】6;】75;【10;】06;_اهم&\#160】4\;\】77; تن&【】#1592;يم【 #جمعي】ة_أصد&#/1602;اء_&/#1575;&/#1】604】;ب【10;/74;ة ب&【#15;ع【575;¡Text 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from places\;/77;】】 ا&#【/】16;ا&#/1587;&\#15;ذ/7】; &\#1586;【/610;ن】577; ج\【5;&#/1587;م #&#/1575;ل&】#1593; &#/1608;_ا 】4;&】#1576/;/04;&【#1583; #&#【15【87;اLعة_ا 【4;ش\اي】ة @za】ina_jassim86 و بد/93;\【05;\ م&\#1606; #&【#15【88;】585;كة #\م&【【#1588;اي】593;_ا&#/16】04;م\/605;لك【7】7; با&#/16/04;ت&【#1593;ا&#【【1608; 【/6; م【;ع #أم&#】1606;ا【5;_ا\;لب】;ي/574;】 في #/75;لشما&】#1604;ي\;【77; و #بلدي&/#1577;_【\الش/05;ا/ل&#/1610;ة &/#1588;ك/;【585;/575; ل&】#1605;زارعين الذ¡【0; /Ÿل&#【【0; ا ال/;&#【】571;&#【1591;/ف】575;ل #【575;【604;】زاŸة \&#】160】8;ž【7;ا【&【#1593;د】&\#1607;/&#】1605; في رž【7/; #ش&#【158/0;ž【77;_نوف&\#1605;//76;ر &#【16/08; #نبت/】77;_ 】6;&#】1608\;&/#1】601;مبر من #م/ش【8;】0】4;_غص【;ن/;_ا /4;】6;【81;ي&/#1606; في #كر【انة #ك【585;&/#1575;ن/;ة_ا//60;بحري\ن @bb】n】.b】h &】#1578/;ح&/#1610;ة للم【606;ظم【/;&/#1610;ن ا&\#1604】;】را【/;【74;عين \م】;ن/; #žWatch back: 【Greta T\】hunber\g says /she/】9;s not nervous a/s she gets ready for America【s trip;معية/;_/9;دق/;اء_】ا&【#1604;&/#1576;&【】#16】10;ئ/;【77】; #&\#1605;&/#1593;لم&#/1578;نا 】و &\#1605\;دي\رة #【&#【1585;نم&\#1】580;_ري【م #خولة_ا//【604;م】607;نSي &/\#05;س&#】1572;】608;ل /5\;لنظ/610;م 【و&】#1575/; &#/1571【;ن【588;طة &【#1575;لش\;ب】】;Kب\¡/0;【57】7; ال】;【593;Ÿ【0;&【#1608;ة الن】;ط】】77; 【571;. /زي/;ن قاه&】#1585;【610; #【75;ل】57/8;ع&#/04;ي&/#1605;_ا/&#】1604;&#】1576;&【#1610;ي #الت&【#1/593;ل&】#1】610;م_ا\;لب\】610;ئي_ال】قيم/10;【 #】1;م【;ا&【#161/0;&】\#1577;_ا【;لبي】/4; #ا&【#160/4;بيئ&#/1577; #الأ\【;ف&/#1575;ل #\&】#1575;لبي/4;ي\/;ي #/60】2;ا\د】【77; #البي&/#1574【;&/#17; #】75;&【#1604;صغار\; #ب¡Soybean\ s【kiwear is th/e new plan】t-ba/【\sed tre【nd of 2020;&\#13/;ي_【571】;ز\;】585;ع @environmentfriendssociety @efs_bahrain @reem.\efs 】خل【75;ل &#】1605;ر】03;/ اط】601;ا】;【 قادة 【】6;ž】5; 】6;ا【05;&#【1【580; ر】610;م &#/01;ي فعا&#/1【6】04;ية &#/1576;【10;دي ازرع 【ا】04;تي 】8;قا&【#160; كل شهر #ا\;لت/;ع【604;/10;【0】5;_&#】15【75;لب/;يئ #【التع&【#16/04【;&】#1610;م_الب/10;&#】15/74;ي/【;_&\#1575;&/#1604;قيم【/;&#/1610; #&】#\】1581;ما&#【1【6/10】;】/7;_البي【4;】ة #ا/604;ب/يئ&/#1577; #الأط ا&#/04/; #&#】1575;【604;بيئيين #】602;ا\; ة #البي\Jة【; #ا【ل/】صغار #ب¡/0;دي_&#/1571;ز&#】1585;ع @】env【iro/n/men】tfriendssocie\ty @efs_b\ahra\in\ /@】reem.efsA po\st shared by &【#1576;ر\;ناج ر【610; 【5; - REEM Pro】gram (@reem.\efs) on/ Nov 30, 2019 at 5】:34am PSTShare /this artic\leCopy/paste【 the artic】\le video embed link/ below:CopyShareTweetSharese】ndSha】reTweetSharesen/dMoreHideShareSendShareShareS\h\areSen】【\】dShareS】h/areYou might a】l】so like 】 \ 【 ‘Kokoro’ is celebrity 】chef 【Nobu/ Matsuhis\a’s se/【/cret ingredient \ / \ / 【 / Can UAE oyster f】a【rmers rival their global compet\itors? 【 \ \ / 】 【/ \ \ Globa/l energy deman】d debated at/ Abu Dhab/i Sus】tainability We/ek 【 / 】 / More aboutRecyclingFoodEnvironmental 】protec/tionUnited Arab Em/ir/ates Browse 【today'\s tag\srrfy

nTEtIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsF14o

9y3KText sizeAaAa“Every】 time I \have a bath, st】ill now, I say 【than/k you. I sti【ll feel the gratit/ude. Every morning when I wake up and can make/ a cup of tea without building a fi/re, I think ‘god that’s so amazing I ca\n do that.’”I was t\hrille/d when Alex Fisher agreed to meet 【me, k【een to tell a s【tory that has been \【【overloo】ked in the last 25 years - forgotten as a new wave of climate ac【tion sets in. Alex was an env【【iron\m】enta【【l campaig/\ner for se】veral ye\ars in t】he 1990s,\ st\and\ing up for th】e tr【ees w】hen【 go【\vernment scheme/s 】thre\a【tened to\ cut /them down\. For a whole yea【r, she liv/ed outside i】n t【he /fo】rest, often/ /h】igh up in treeh/ouses or &lsq/uo;twiglo\o/s’, abse【iling d】own tree trunks in th【e morning for b】reakfast.\ Magical as it may sou】nd, the realit/y was far from the【 Enchante】d Wood in the 】Enid Blyton se\ries, a/ childho/\】od fav【o【urite of /my intervi【ewee. \For c】ampai【gners like Alex,【 it was a v【eheme【nt form of activism ag\ainst politically mo\tivated deforestation, enforced by【 /law in a bid to build mo/re\ /road【s.&l【dq/uo;&po/und;20 b\illion w【\as the budget&r【dq/\uo;/, s【he recalls. &ldq/uo;They called it the bigg\est road building s/cheme since the Romans.”\/ 【\For the 【activists, the p】roble/m wasn&rsq【/uo;t only the size of the project, but/ the places they had \chosen to bui\ld 】/th【e ro/ads. Alex/ speaks n】ostalgically \of whole /landsca】pes that were destro【yed, 500-year-】old trees】, bluebell forests, wat【/e【rfalls a【nd SS】SIs【 (specia/l si】tes of sc/i【【entific /interest) which served【 】as vital animal habi】tats. “An/ oak tre】e suppo】r/ts hundre】ds of different /species”, she te】lls me\, adding/, “】w/hen you cu\t one【 down, that’【s 500 years】 of gr【owth undone /then a】nd/ 【there.】 I】 pl】anted 10 sapli】ngs from an/ o\ak tree 25 years ago, but \they are/n’t eve\n \/old enough yet /to make a【co【rns &nda\sh; it/ takes【 】30 years.&rdq/uo;Alex's ne/wspape\r clippings from her scrapbook, char\ting 【he/r time at the road protests c】amps\Euronews LivingFrom fashion t】o the f/or\e】stFor\ \Alex, a d/】eep love and r】esp【ect f\//or nature de】veloped\ e】arl【\y on. 【G【r/owi\/ng up on the /outskirts of Brighton, she spent mos】t of her childh\ood cycling in th】e countrysi【\de and 】playin/g in her very own】 treehous】e at the end /of \the garden. As【 a young ad/ult, she moved to Lo/n/don in s/earch \of a career in fashion jo/urnalism, swap】pi】ng her/ rural roo/ts for t/he bright lights of the city.Sh\e ended up 【working 【at Vogue and, wh【】ile \her time th【ere was “unb/elievabl】y excitin【g”, sh】e soon realised that the fashion industry simply existe】d/ to\ \pr】omote what she calls &ldq【【uo;obsolete consumeri/sm.”\ “It wasn’t abou】t// caring”, she /tells m【e, “they may have seasons in 【fashion - //bu】t they take tha】t from n/ature.” What’s in for Au】tumn is out by Sp】ri/ng,【 encouraging a constant loop o\f disposal materi/alism t/hat is pol】luting the earth.&ldqu\o;I【 took som\/e t\ime out after starting my c\are\er t\o 】think about what I car/ed about m/ost.【 We were on course to destruct the planet and when I hear/d about the road p【rotest movement,/ I kne/w\ I\ had to go and take part/ &nd【ash; it wasn&rsq/uo;t /enough【 ju/st t【o talk about it. I needed to act, and I was willing to risk my life in the process.”Ale】\x\ Fish\e【rEu】ronews Living/Leaving London with a friend,】 Alex/ se】t up camp for the yea\r at the Fair】mi【le prot【est s/ite in Devon\. She \speaks fondly of\ how quickly she/ adap\ted to living /outsid】e. &l\dqu/】o;I \r】em\e/mber w\aking up in the morning, making the fir】e】 】and get everyon\e \&ls【quo;breakfast\ed’.&r/\dquo; She【 des】cribes the resourceful ways they\ woul/d\ have\ to【 adapt to w/eather【\ conditio\ns like snow. What】 daily li\fe wa\s like living outside“\Often the】 water butt w【oul】d h\ave frozen overnight a\nd I w\ould literally have to 】gat\her up the snow and melt it to try and m/a\ke people a cup of t】ea.” E【【veryday tas【ks involved cooking communa【l fo/od, “which was always vegan, because tha】t covers everyone”,/ choppi【ng /wood f/or t\he communal fire pit and carrying\ water.&ldquo】;We al/l lived in d/ome-sh/aped b【enders in【 the tree【s,【 made from】 will】ow poles. 【You connecte【d the branches to a platf\o/】rm underneath, and cov【ered it wit】/h waterproof tarp\aulins and blankets from】 the\ recycling centre.” Curious, I ask how 】they【 managed to stay wa【rm, especially【 at ni【ght d/uring the/ win\t/【er months. “Pretty much everyone/ wore ski/】 salopett】es】 th/ey picked up 【from s\ec】ond-】hand shops 】and got used to 【wear】in【g】. And /of course we m/ade wo/od stoves in every bender to huddle/ round - I remembe】【r sitting there in/ just a t-shirt in】 】Dec\ember in【side a treehouse!”T\he 【ha】rsh 【realityBu【t it wasn’t always so tw】ee. The politic【al nat】ure of\ the movement mea】nt that brutal e\victions were the norm w/h【en camping out in certain/ a\reas. 】With t/he same ra【ge she must have felt at the t/ime,\ Alex paints me a p】icture \【o【f\】 the hundreds of security gu【ards, police】 and bailiffs o】n the scene - hir】e】d to 】extract【】【 the ca/mpaigners fro】m t】he trees. &】ld/q\uo;Ther\e w【ere thr】eats o/f sex【ual violence by【 the ma】le/ sec】ur】i\ty, we were fire bombed, it wa\s extremely dangerous”, she re/collects.&ld】quo;】The security guards se\em\ed【 complet【ely unregu【lat\ed. T/【hey were employed by the road \building con\【tr\actors to cu【t us out of trees using【 big cranes called cherry-pickers. At】 one evictio/【n, I was 【str】appe\d to a tree with a 【harness on, when a pr】ofessional climber cut my s\afety line and came a】/n】d grabbed me. I was scared for my life.”\ Photos of the evi【ctions from 】A【le/【x's scr/apbookEuronews LivingThat t】ime she was arreste【d, /she a/dmits. Taken to the police s/ta/tion with purple/ bruises /up h】/er arm from the quick cuffs, she w【as /【photogra】phed and fi\ngerprinted befo\re being let go with a warning. In many ways, Ale/x rec【all】s she was one of the l【ucky \ones. “I \remem/be/r one person fell 】out of a tree a【/n】d ended up i【n a wheelchai\r.&rdquo/; She de/】sc【ribes the end/uring t\rauma from that period in /t/he】ir live【s, t【he so【un\d of chainsa【ws haunting them for years after the\ \pro\test e【nded. The frustration an\d anger behind \it a\ll, the shee/r horror of decimating the landscape kept 】the campaigner】s 】going every day, Alex exp【l/】【ains. &】l【dquo;Bu/ilding mor【e roads seemed a strang【e policy to adopt when the en\vironmental issues were s/\o well known&rdquo】;, she says. &/ldquo;They should have been 【【investing in the railways and in c/yclin\g rout【es./ T【here seemed complete disregard for any】where th\at was environmentally\ protected【.&r\dquo;The magic of th/e tre\esNonethele【s】s, a【 profou【nd sense of 【community\ and joy appeared to enc【o】/mpa】ss the 】m\ovement】 wherever 【sh\e went. “There was so muc\h\ beauty a/nd joy, it was the s】ubtle th【【ings”, Alex la/ments. //“W/【hen you are in the forest twenty-f】/our hours a day, there【 are cert】ain \things you can’【t experience anywhe】/re else. Like how the l】ight 】changes at 6 o【’clo/ck i\n the 】/morning,【 【th】e sou】n\ds of 【t/he rain on the tarpaul\in,\】 an【d wak/ing up to t/he da\wn c【horu\s.&rdquo】/;Sp】en/ding /much of /her ti/me swimmin/g and washing \in the rivers, she r【e/members that magical feelin】g wh【en, “a/ll of a /sudden, a flock o/f swans w】/o/uld just/ glide past/ 】you.” 】T【hose e【xperiences stay with h】/er t【oday as “beautiful moments where you\ just f】elt it 【was 】such a gif/t to/ be alive.”Photos of the \trees fr\o/m Alex'\s scrapbookEuronews Livin】gSpeaking】 to this \brave, humb】le woman, who ha】s never expected any recog】nition for the f/ight she foug【ht in defence of our trees, I get the 】impress\/ion that i\t wa【s an immense//ly positive time in her lif/e. Yes, th【\e brutality o【f 【the evi】ctions was traumatic, but the 【sense of\ sol【idarity p/erv】ading the movement /see【m/ed more powerf【】ul【\. The simp【l/e pleasur\es of/ cooking aro】un/d a fire every night /and the variety of roles th】e com/munity/ would play 】i】n /sustaining the camps. 】I ask h】er \wha/t she means by /this, a【nd she explains h\ow yo】u di】【dn’t ha】ve 】to be/ living outsid【e to /be part o】f the m【o】vemen】t.&ldquo】;At one of the most 【high-profile ca\mps in】 Ne/w【bur【y, e】veryda/y\ peop/le wo【uld/ come o/ut of t【heir hous【es and sa/y - 【who wan【ts a bath? Y\ou would see 70 campaigner【s graciously accep\ting, queuing up【 ou【tsid】e someone&rs】quo;s house【 to /ha/v【e a bath.【”】/ It was /the gener【osity of /the/ community /that allowed them to c\ontinue/, Alex says, and food【 /and 【clothing dona【tions from individuals /that qui】te 】litera\ll】y sustained t】he camps for a number of yea\rs.How does climate action compare today?In the en/d【,/ the road protest move/ment didn’t st\op the\ whole network from being /built, but nume】rous roads and bypasses were cance【lled at the end of 1996. Ac\t\ivists d/id man/age to save a】 l】o/t of 【landscape, \which “fee【ls like a succes/s&rdq】u】o;】【, Alex/ recalls\ /with a sad smile. “【We increa\sed awareness. At l】east 【politi\cians give lip s\ervice/ to\ envir【onmental issu\es n】owa】d/ays. They \didn’t even spea\k a\b【out it back\ t【he【n, and 】I’d like to【 think】 we had someth】ing to do with that shi\ft i/n cons\cious【ness.&r/d】quo;A shot of】 】the treehouse f】rom the/ ground at【 the protes\t campEuronews LivingWhen I \bring h【er b/ack to 】the present mom/ent and ask what she thinks【 abo/ut 【t】【he cl】imate moveme】nt t】oday, she seem【s frustrated. &ldq/uo;It&】/rsquo;s sad because everything has got so/ mu】ch worse than it\ wa【s 25 years ago, t【he gla】ciers ar】e melt【ing faster\ than ever, we’ve al/ready lost so mu】】ch 】w\ildlife.”I c\an sense】 the\ act\ivist is still alive and we/】ll in/ Alex, despite her more conventional li/festyle nowaday】/s, as an/ editor of a magazin【e】, /liv【in\g in \a house i】n Sussex with 】her son. \But all hope\ is not l】ost. &l】dquo;Greta Thunberg ha【s been /】/an amazi【ng ca/taly/st for 【the yo/ung【e】r generation”, she says. “The situa】t】【ion\ may be/ worse】 but the awarenes】s has broaden【ed. Ext/inction R\ebe】llion ha/ve mobili/sed so many people &ndash】; back then\ we wer/e called ‘crusties’, treated as ma\d\】 members\ of/ society 】an【d ost】racised.”While those o【ver the a\ge of forty wi/\ll likely remember the】】 efforts of the ro\ad p【rotest m【ovement in 90s Britain, millennials are none the wiser. I am grateful 】to have【 met Alex and to share her 【story, as grassroots climate 】act/ivism【 takes hold /of society once】 again in 2019. A 】&】】ldquo;second wav【\e”, A】lex sugges】ts. Ha\vi\ng learnt how to be s/elf\-suffici【en\t, \she&r/squo;ll never take 【for gran\ted the re\sources /that nature can provide a【nd /often longs for the days w\h【en she relied】 on the si\mple warmth of an open fire.【Share t】his article 】 / More from placesxZ8R

DO4hFamily-run fish/eries struggle /as \new generati\on casts net widerY9ua

1.ur3CDo e【nvironmental documentaries actually have an impac【t on p【eople’s bad】 ha/bits?98aM

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4.OI9NTe/xt s】iz/e】AaAa】Just ye【s【t】erday it was annou\nced t\ha【t/ 170 global news \ou\tlets have signed up for th//e week-\】lon/g &lsquo/;Covering Cli】ma\te Now\&\rsq】uo; pledg】e, starting from】 16【th Septe】mber.In an attempt to boo\st the media’s coverage of the cl/imate crisis, \US-based /Columbia Journalism Rev【【iew (CJR) came up with the 'Cov\【ering Climate Now' init\】i/ative /back in M/a】y, alo\ngside /progressive m/aga【\zine The【【 Nation. Participatin】g outl【\ets are expe】cted to partake in a week dedicat【ed to spr】eading a\war【eness around the climate crisis, through repor【ti/ng 】on uniquely environm】ental iss】【ue/s.The pledge w\as announced following an 【article, co-written b】y t\】he【 respective /e/ditors o【f the two/ \publi】catio【ns, on the C】JR, entitled &ls/quo;The media are compla【】cent while the】 w/orld burns&r/squ\o;. A long re】ad at \【over 5,【000 words/, the detailed pi/ece addr【esses/ the【 &l【dquo】;climate silenc\【e】” that pervades the bulk of the news &ldquo\;when civili】zation is ac/celerating toward disas】ter.&】rdquo; View this po\st【 on Instagram/O/ver/ 170 n【ews outlets f\rom around 】the wo】rld 】have now signed up \f\or Co】vering Climate N\ow, a pr/\oj/\ect co-founded by CJR and The /Nation aimed at stren【g【thening】 the media’s focus on 】the climate crisi【s. 】Click the link in our bio t】o \learn about our proje\ct. #\c【limatechan/ge【 #oureart/hproject #organic #sustainability #e【co【 #earth #ecostyle #gogreen #nature】 #globalwarming #blue #mountain #be【autiful #【No】pollut】ion #】pico【ftheday #coveringclimatenow\A pos\t shared by Colum\bia Journalism R\e\view (@columbiajourn\a】lism\review) o【n Aug 28/,】 201【9 at/】 12:02pm PDTNow that th【e initiative h/as come into full 【f/【orce, 170 out\lets ha【ve jumped on the b】andw\【ago】n, agreeing t【o a week of ‘Co\v\er\ing Cli/mate \Now’. The coverage be\gins on 16th\ Sept\ember and will deliber【/ately coincide w\ith th/e United Nations Cli】mate Action S【ummit i】n N\ew York on 23rd Sep】tember/, whi】ch will culminate】 t】he week.【 】A【t the summit,【 global government【s will lay ou】】t exactly 【【how they plan 【to me/et the Par\is Agr\eement to combat climate change. The central】【 a/im of th\is agreement 【is to work together t\o /keep th/e 【global temperature “w\ell belo\w” 2 degree】s Ce\】lsius above pre-indust/ri\al levels.T/he 170 participa【nts ra】【nge from wire【 service】s to /newspapers, magazines,】 educationa】l institutions, \【】TV a\nd radi】o channels and even】 independent journalists. National public /【【TV broadc\asters in\ Italy, Sweden/ and the Un/】it】\ed States will be invo\【lved, as well as scholarly journa【/【ls such as the Harvard Business R【eview.Many of/ the outlets【/】 partak【】】i\ng ar【e\ g/lobally renowned, such as Bloomberg, CB】/S News\, The Guardian, \/Vice Media and Busi】ness】 Green,\ and incl/ude independen】t j/ou/【rnalists such as Benj\amin【 Ryan from The New York Times and Alex Thomson f\or 【Ch/annel 4 News.Mark Hertsgaard【, /a\uthor \and environment co】rrespondent f\or The Nation magaz\ine, \wh/o is helping to organize 'Cov【ering Climate Now',【 told Euronews Living about his inspiration be【hind 】starting the cam】paign.“I’ve/ been co/ver【ing climate change since 1/989, rep/orting from/ 25 countries/ around the【 world\/ a】n】d much /of】 the Un\ited\ States,\ and it 【has long be】en clear that most news outle/ts have underplayed 【if n/ot outright ignored the】 en【ormous imp】orta\n/ce of the climate story."H【ertsgaard went on to emphasise that the m/edia sector m】ust【 "tra【/nsform", citing the impetus for 'Covering /Climate/ No【w' as the UN /Inte\rgovern】mental Panel 】on Climate Cha】nge's landmark 1.5 C report last October/.I【s o\n/e week of environmental coverag\e enough?For many climate /change activis】ts, s】imply o】ne week of coverage may not \suffic】e, given the gr】ave /en【vironmental adversity we are facing a】s a \planet.Zio/n Lights, a national spo\kes【person for Extinction Rebe/llion UK, \【told \【Eu\ronews Living that 【the crisis we are 】facing is "bigger than any w\ar.""Although it's g】】ood t】o hear \that the】 media will be/ giv\ing this increased coverage to】】 the climate a】nd eco/logi】/c】al c【risis, it's still simply not enough to address t【he】 situation we ar【e in. It's importan】t that more journalists wa】【ke up to the realit】y of /this cris【is【, whi】ch 【req】uires f\ocused a/nd continuou【s reporting【, simil【ar】 to war time coverage since what we are facing 】is bi】gger than/ any war."Cli\mate chan【ge protestor【sSh\e co】nclu\ded by saying, "a week is nowhere /ne】【\ar enough time to tackle the crisis we a】re in."Morten】 Thysen, a【 Clim/ate Cam\paigner for Greenpe\ace U】K】, /also】 told Euronews Living that\ this is "good news, abo【ut very/ bad news."“Most of the 【news media has rigorousl\y】 ignored】 【th【/e climate crisis fo】r【 three\ decades, and so it’s encou】rag/ing that th【ese outlets are tryin【g a d/ifferent tac【/k. Hopef/ully this period of intensive coverage will \crea\te dee】per/ un\dersta【ndin\g /an【d engagement w【hic\h lasts longer than the week in questi\on.”Share t】his article 】 【【【 Mor】e from liferTNB

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UDyaClimate cha【nge【】/ h】a/s played /heavily in 2/019, with activists/ around the/ wor/ld h】olding protests and cal\li\ng on go【vernments t【o make a c【hange. Experts s\ay that the climate emerge】ncy is the most urge】【nt【 /is】sue of o/\u\r time.One organisation, the 【Bari【lla Centre for Food and Nutrition,】 has\ d【【ecided to try】】 and tackle the /proble】m head-on.They say it&rsquo/;s import/ant for t【hem to take a step towards mak/ing an effective c/hange as gre】enhous/e gas emissions creat【ed by】 \food production, distribution and c/onsumption were// &ld【quo;identif\ied 【a/s playing a key role” in the climate\ crisis.This /year 】mar\ks the 10th year that the/ fou【ndation has 】organised /the Inte\rnational \Forum\ on F\oo】d and Nutrition in Milan.The organ】is【ati】on s/ay】【s the forum focusses /on p\romoting drastic change in the mindset of al\l stakeh\olders, whether/ governments, civil society or/ganis】ations, private se】ctor, or research and s/】cience.With 】a thi\rd of CO2 emi\ssions caus】【ed by foo/d p\roduction, the B\arill【a foundation's 'Su-Eatabl】e Li【/fe' p】\roject aims to 【change diets on a large scale.O/ne of the 】expert】s who was at the forum, Ri/cc【ard//o Val】entini, believes/ in o】rder to【 pr【oduce food mor\e sustainably people nee/d to:“【reduce【 their footprint in /terms of/ greenhouse gas emissions, and so to move their diets from unsustainable t/o /more climate-】friendly diets.&rdquo/;Also o】n the agenda was th【【\e Digitising Agrifo【od r/eport, w\hic\h looks at】 new and 】inno/vativ\e ways to prod】uce【 【foo/d in a mo【re environmentall】y friendly way. It involves exploring the potential【 o】f d/igital technol\o\gies to make food produ】ction more sus/tain\able.We spoke 】】to one of the au【tho【rs of the repor】t And【rea Re】nda who explaine】d h【】ow te【】chnology could be u】sed to help tackle the \problem:"【【Puttin\g s\ensors in th/e/ s/o【il and asking t\hose s/ensors to really colle/ct \the i【nforma【tion on whe】n an】d how the】 s/oil should /be \treat/ed, whether the tempera】ture/, whether t\h】e moisture i\s cor【rect, and so【 on/【e can be m\uc【h mo/re surgical in treating\ the soil.”Watch our Spotlight repor/t by O\la】f Bruns for more about what the foundation 】is doing to tackle t】he problem of cli】mate 】change.Share this articleCopy/pas【te the 】article video \em】bed link below:【CopyShar】eT【weetSharesendS】hareTwee】tSharesendM\oreHideSh】areSendShareShare\S\hareSendShar【eShareMore about//SummitFoodEnvironmen\tal protectionMilano 【 【Browse /to【d】a【y's tagsnKHl

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s6y4Al\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsNBpC

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E5F9Bio/economy matter/\sIn this episod【/e, F【u/t/uris vis】its a /bioproduct mill i】n 】Finland where scientists, manage】rs, and inv\estors trying to p/roduce sustainable produ/cts using les/s \water and 】less energy.In the last】 f】e【w 【years, the European Un\ion has invested almos\t 4 billion eu】ros in re】search /a\imed at developing】 the】 economy in su/stai【nabl】e wa/ys.The B\ioecono【my sector a/lready employs 18 mil/lion p/e/ople with an\ annual turnover of around 2 trillion euros.Tha\t's】 /a hug/e/【/ economic pot/en】tial for\ agricul\ture, forestry, fisheries, food\, and bio-energy, that rely on a myriad of bio-base\d p【roducts cu/rren/tl\y being de/v\elop】【ed and hitting the markets around the whole continent.The \pot/ential of //pulpThe &A\uml;änek/osk】i bioprodu\c/t mil】l i】n Finland】 believes that【 it is /possible to【 transform】 up to 6.5 million cubi\c meters of pulpwood\, eve【ry yea\r, without using【 a sing/le drop\ 【of /fossil fuels.240 trucks and 70 full/y【 loaded train-w【ago\ns】 feed the mill every day with birch, spru\ce, and pine./Th\/e wo\od i【s 【used to prod【uce 【pulp, which has an annual\ p/】r】\oduct/ion\ of around 1.3 million tons.And yet, no fossil 【f】uels are \used /in t\he /whol】e pro\ces【s. 】Its managers say the mil/l i\s /completely self-suffi】cient."We are producing two and a half t/\imes more energy】 than we /are using ou\/r】s/el\ves," says Camilla Wikstr/【öm//, the 】senior/ \vi【ce-president\ /o【f Metsä\ Fibre."We /have sludge, an\d from\ the sludge【\, we/ ar\e making biogas. And then 】we have the bark, f\/\rom which we/ a【re m】aking\ product-gas and also the bark is sold out for en/ergy use outside\ the mill."【\The whole system is based on 】the idea of trying to prod】uce sus【tain【able products using less wa】ter and 】/less en/ergy. And co/ming up with ideas of ho】w】】 to use pulpwo/od i】n products other than the \usual paper an\d cardboard:"We have the ongoing pr【oject of making te】xtil/es fr【om the pulp. And also /the p\oss\ibility to 】make composites to replace 】plastics," adds Ca/milla Wi/kström.In la【boratories at the m\il\l, th【e inner prope\rties of raw materials are closely monit【\ore】d. Researchers ar【e driving t/】he development\ of sustainable thr\ee-lay/er cardboards aim\ed at i/n】/novative packagi/\ng."We are/ d】eveloping our /hig】h】\-yie【ld p】ulp】s and we/ are optimizing th】e three-layer st\r【u】ctu\re and\ then we need to know t【he information of the surface layers and then the b/ulky midd/le layer," sa/ys Terhi Saar【i, C/hemist \& director of the techno【logy 【c】enter, Metsä Bo\ard. "And (the aim is) to \make enough stre\ngth and stiffne/ss for our products".The mill required an initial inve/stment\ of 1.2 bill】ion 【euros and 【managers hope tha\t innov/at/ive green products made o\ut】 of wood will 】hel】p【 pa/y o【ff that huge inves\tment."Most/ o【f the new p【roducts/ \developed over 】the last 50 years or so w【er\e based o【n oil, they are \petroch\emical product【s," says Iklas von/】/ Weymarn, CEO of M\etsä Spri/ng."But now the situation /in terms of the business envir/o/nment, including climate】/ chan/ge an/d so o\n, is chang/ing, and【 it opens up new possibiliti】es to produce these prod【ucts fr\om wood."\Bi【【odegradable bagsAnot/】her key step in reducing 】our dependency on fos\sil fuels is/ our/ capacity t/o produce mor【e and better biodegradabl/【e,【 co【mpostabl【e biopla\stics.Resear/chers 【in Novamont \in\ northern Italy are currently developing 】and te\sting】 experimental\/ technologies to create biop】la/st】ic【s 【\fr\om ingred【ients 】suc【h as corn starch【, cellulose and vegetable oi\ls as raw materials.The /manufacturing ch\a\in \is comple\x and includes \mechanical processes 【like extrusion 【and b】lowi【ng, wh】ich trans\forms th/e natural materials\ into biopla】stic 】fi//lms,【 that can late【r be used/ to produce】 /\b】iogradable shop【【ping bag【s a/nd other biod】egrada【ble and com【postable products su【ch a\s 【plat【es, gla【sses and cutlery:The process of composti【n\/g\ or biodegrading】 these plastics into something more element】al, 】like organic carbon,\ or simply 】compo】st, takes \a long ti\me and the right c/ondi\tions.\Ale【s\【sandro【 D】&a】cute;elic【io【, an industrial chem【ist a【t No【【vamont sa/ys i/t's an u】ndergro】und process: "molecules of these 【b/ioplastics become, little by little, simpler, thanks to the a/ct\ion of microorgan\isms."T【he need for mech/anical tests is】】【 als/o importa】nt as bio】plast\ic 】must off/e/r 】th【e same str//ength \a】nd re【si】lience as ord\inary pet/ro/ch【emical plastics./ But ther\e is e\ven m】\ore to it:"Bey】ond /these m【echanical t/ests, w\e can al\/so ma】ke here qualitat/ive tests," says A】le【ssandro D´e【licio.【"We】 can/, for i\nst【ance\, measure the friction rate, or all p【roper\tie\s linked t/o the permeab【ility of the biomateria/ls,【 or /i【ts optical /properties"】These/ tests are part of】 a \Europe/a【n research projec【t ai/med at rethink【ing】 the whole plastic v】alue chai\/n, in an effort to create new business model/s and to better pr/otect the en】vironment./Researc】hers meet regu/larly to\ brainstorm new /innovation/s and 【eco-de/signs using bioplastics."We don´t simply want to c\hange one】 product for ano/ther," s/ays Luigi Ca\pizz\i, head】 】of research & developmen【t at Nov/amont."This is【 not our aim. We【 want to/ develop a syst\em that can mak【e /better use of the reso【urces of the planet; cons/uming【 less of thes/e re/sources, and redistributin/】【g them in a fairer, more】 efficien【t way."Educating the consumerEurop【e pr/oduces\ ar\ound 25 m】i【llion t//ons/ of pl】astic\ waste eve【ry year. On】ly a third is re】cycled, 【the rest/ is either in】carcerated or ends up in landfills,【 s\o u/rgent so//lutions are /\】\indeed nee】ded.Action on plastics was identifie/d by the European Commission in January 2018 as a priority /in the C【ircular Economy Action Plan, to help/ Europe】an/ businesses /and consumer\s to 【use r\【esou\rces i【【n a more sust/aina【ble way\.Sap/onia/, a/ leading de\terg\ent and personal hygiene pro【ducts ma\nu/fact】ure/r in Croatia is already【 us】【ing /b/iopla【stics\】 on the interior of their deterg\en/t pa\ckaging/."We \star/ted usi【ng a certai【n ty\pe of 【bioplas【\tic produ/ct【 /】/and then simply teac】\/h our consumers tha】t/ its\ better for them an\d for the en\viro【nment," says Andrea Bozi】】\c, h\ead of education】 and information center at【 Saponi/a."So ov【e\r【 time//, we noticed【 】that they a\ccepted these types of plas\tics and product pa【ck/ag】ing, so we will simply broad\en it \to our ot【her pro\du/cts."Resea/rchers hope their work will add /to a European 】tar\get of s】ome 10/ mill/ion to\ns of recyc/【led plastic】s being\ t【【】ransformed i\nto n/ew products by 2025.A【lo/ng with research and innovation, sc\ientists/ sa\y, education will play a c】ru/】cial ro/le in me\eting tha/t objective."There are cou】n】tries\】 in Northern Europe whose plastic waste management system i\s ve\ry well im】plemented an【d deve】loped】," says Montserrat Lan/ero, an indus【trial engineer an【//d CIR】/C-PA】CK project manager."Bu\t in other countri【es, th/is management of p】lastic wa【st【e does not ev【en exis【t. A/nd【 many】 cit/izen/s don't know what the implications of this bad manageme】nt are when it 【comes】 to \】how plastics end up in t/\【he o\ceans or ent】\er o】ur f\ood chain【.""So one of ou】r main challenges i【s to understand what are th】e needs\ of each Euro\pean cou\ntr/y to be a\ble to find /as】 many ada】pte\d solutions as we \can".To und】erstand thos【e needs, researc【hers hav】e turned t】o the concept o【f "citizen scien/【ce", /inv【olving consumers associations, to understand what the social and market expe【ctations are when i/t /comes to \reinforcing th】e ci】r】cular economy in the plas】tic sector."We need to e】m/power the citizen. Beca】use often t/hey /don'】t realize t\h】at their shopping【\ decis/i/o】\n is very important /in 】movin/g the market toward】s more \sustainabl】e trend【s," says Bel&eac\/ute;n Ramos, project officer for the envi】ro/\nment【 a】/t the Spani\sh Organi\sation of Consumers and Users Consu【mers - O【CU."B/ut we\ also need to em【po/wer th】e market so it can give\ a】 wider array of c\hoices to the consumer."On【e European research pr】ojec/t studyi【ng /t【h】e possibilities/ of\ crea/ting new b【ioproducts /which we\re previou【sly mad/\e with \chemic/als or oil-based /prod/ucts is the Exil】va biorefinery in N【orway./Scientists there ar【e【 tr】ying to transfor【m trees into products for at s【ectors as diverse as the automotive industry, the adh\esive ind\us【try,/ and even cosmetics.Every year 1 millio】n cubic】 meters of Norw【egia\n spruce \are trans】formed into cel/lulose, l【ignin, bioeth【anols and ce【llulo/se【 fibers.T\hese cellulose fibers/ can be turned/ into 【bioproducts through a proc【ess known a/s 【"fibrillat/ion"."The properties that som\e of the custom】/ers are looking f】or are th\e controlled vis/cosity it off/ers, so for instance /whe【n you are paintin【\g, yo】u avoid drippi/ng 【or sagging of the\ pain\t when you are applying it to t/he wal】l," says Jarle Wikeby, a ch/emical e\ngineer at【 Ex/il\va."Or you can c【ontrol the har/de】\ning 【process within adhesives. And y\ou can also have a g【ood effe】ct by adding the/ product i【nt/o c\osmetics, or \antiwrinkle/ creams】 for instanc/e."Laborato\ry research \helps improve th【e properties of th】e product and en\hance its array of industrial applications.Sc/ientists at Borregaar\d /biorefinery wo\rk to develop hi】gh efficiency and/ robust 】products for harsh environments."We are looking at particle size or specific aggregate sizes,\" 】say【s\ K\ristin 【Weel Su\ndby\, a chemist 】at Borregaard."As yo/】u \might kno\w, we also have\ two different qual/ities, one is more fibri/llated that the other. \And we 】are also starting to】 look at more film properties. With the product, you can ma【ke films/ tha/t have very goo/d\ barrier propertie【/s, oxygen barrier\s, that give strength to the /products."The pro【duct i\s one o\f】 the 700 bas】】ed on n/atural ra/w materials】 /being develope【d the\re, which【 managers 】s/ay is a trend that should grow/ in the c\omi【ng\ years:"Our product is typic\/ally a little help【er. /So you\ on】ly need a \litt\le【 new formulation to change completely a product f\rom oil-based to water-based," says Pal Rombe】rg,/ vice-pre【sident】 of B】orregaard."So 【i/t is not really a cost issue here. 】Consumer a\wareness a\nd general public aw】areness crea\te a drive】 fo\r more sustainability and /greener product\s. And this r\e】ally motiv/ates companies 】out there【 to go d【own【 tha\】t 】road a【nd really/ sp【end on resources fo【r devel】oping new,【 better products".Th】ese better products,【 rese【archers sa】y,/ should keep【 s\tea】dil\y coming to\ the ma】rkets, as t】he \European Uni/on is planning to invest a】nother 10 billion eu】r【os in\ Bioeconomy research by 】2027.12 】 【 FUTURIS \LONG 1\ / 】】 \ 12 / \ \ 】 / / FU/【【TURIS LONG 1 / 】 \ 【 12 】 / \ /FUTURIS LONG 1 】 【 【 【 \】 \ 12 】 /】 【 / FUTURIS \L\ONG \ 【 【 12 【 / FUTURIS LON【G 1\ \ / 】 / / 【 \ 】 Share th/is ar】ticleCopy/pas\te the article video embed link\ bel\ow:CopyShar/eT/weetShare\se\ndShareTwee】tSharesendMoreH【ideShareS/endShareShareShareSendShar/eS\hareY】ou might also li】ke 【 / 】 Sar\dinian thistles play /key 】rol/e in bioplastics 】 【 【 / / Could bio-plastic 】\/be the answer to bot【tl\】e wo\es? 】 \ 【 【 More a【boutSust\ainable devel/opment【RecyclingEnvironm】ental】 protection 】 M/\ost viewed / / 【\ \ \ W【ha】】t influence on climate is the cor【onavirus lockdown really having? 【 /\ The ne\w AI【 system sa\feguar\ding\ prem\ature b\abies f/rom infecti】on / \ / \ Messenger RNA: th\e mol/ecule /th\at may tea\ch o\ur bod\ie【s to beat cancer/ \ 【 /\ / \ / 】 \Apple and Goo【gle sa/y t\he\y&\#039;ll w】ork together\ to tr\ace spread o\f coronavirus via smartphones 】 \ 】 【 How EU funding is changing】【 the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 \ // Brows【e today's tagsuFrL

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EzF9What if】\ 】/】we use】d the sea to diver\s/\if//y the stock of a/vailable biofuels?Resear\chers in Aarhus, De\nm【a\rk, are developing a fin【ancially via】ble process that does 】just that/.An ordina\ry ca】r is used to test the seaw【\eed fu【e\l, whi【ch scientists ca//ll a 3rd generation biofuel, and is a sustainable alternative to f/oss\il fuel】s.The tank is filled w】ith 10% seaweed fuel,】 the rest with petrol】 and its performance is compared with gas station fuels."The/ e【missions we 【meas【ure are CO, C【O2, and NOX. And \addi】tionally, we are measuring th/e pa/rticula/te emissi】on】s from th】e car,"/ sa\ys Sten Frand\sen - mechanica/l【 e【ngineer and busin】e【ss【 manage】r at DT】\I."The emission te】sts we got fr】om/ the seaweed】 fuel is on exactly the 【s【ame level /\as wha\t w】e \get from the \r】eferen/ce fuel."Sea【weed biofuel 】does not e/mit less CO2,\/ but \unl/ike \petrol, it extracts CO2 from the a\tmosphere while \gro【wing.\The】 researchers plan t\o \increase 】the portion 】used in the engi】ne tank, convinced that w【e will switch 】to biofuels in 【the upcoming years."We see】 a lot of el\ectrical cars entering the m/】arket, b】ut is that a one fix-all solution for /the CO2/ em【ission【s?" asks\ Frandsen."\Because we have hea【vy-duty tran】/\sport, we have sh】i】ps/ we have aerop/lanes,/ still c】onsuming a large amount of fossil fuels. We \nee】d 】a subst】i/tute for tha】t, and maybe\,【 seaweed co【uld be\/ som/e of the【 soluti【【on【".Why /is seaweed sustainabl\e? 【First, be\caus【e it /grows 】everywhere. It only needs the su\n and the sea,// which covers 70% of ou\r planet】.Its cultivation does not /requir【e any arable 】la\nd, 】fertilizer or freshwater/,/ like othe】r\ biof\u【els made out of/ agricultural \r\esidues for exam\ple.But 】how can 【this new fu\el be produced on an industrial 】s/cale? /This is the ch\allenge of 】a European re】search【 pr】oject c/alled Mac/roF/uels.Scien\【tists at the laboratory【 in P/etten, Nether【lands, 】are /searching f【o】r the best way t\o convert/ seaweed sug\ars to f\ue【ls.In/ some specie/s, this can r/【epres【ent up 【to 60% of\ the plant.【In /the l/】ong term, th/ey woul/d no l\onger】 have to produce bot/tles, /b\ut tons of 】ethanol and butanol barrels.】 S】til\l follo】wing a rat\her basi【c process\:"First /w\/e t】ake s\eawe/ed. And t\hen we use wa/ter to get the suga/rs】 out with some enzymes or acids," says Jaap Van 【Hal, a 【chemist &am\p; i【n\【n\ovation manager at b】iorefin/ery, TNO and macrofuel p/roject scie【ntific coordinat】o】r."\A】nd then you \get a sugar solution, and j/ust like you\ pr【oduce wine or beer, you f\er】ment it to /Ethanol or But\anol, and you blend t/hat with normal ga\soline or d【iesel to pr\oduce E10 \and t/hen you 【drive y/our car \on i】t."More biofuel/ production means more /se/aweed biomass. Th/anks to economies of scale an/d mechaniz/at/ion, res/e\archers\ h/ope to cut the fue\l produc【tio/n costs by 100 per cen】t.T【oget【her with comm【ercializi】ng oth/er】 seaweed 【products【, this could make fuels economically\ feasible in the future."When we started】 the p【roject a couple o\f year/s /ago【/, we were working】 with square meters. Today we are do【in\g hectares, 【and in t【he \near future, we will go in the squar/e kilometre range," says Bert Groenendaal【/, a chemist & R&a/mp;/D project coo/rdinator at】 \】SIOEN.T】o/day】, th\e pr】ice 】of a l\itre【 of seaweed-based biofue\l \is /way to\o high, probably a】 /hundred times more expensi】ve than traditi/o】nal fuels. But when the scale will go up, the p】rice will \g】o down, and we【 will\ get into a ran\ge where we will/ be comp\etitive with tr\aditional /fuels."Based】 on the exa\mple of the w】i【nd secto【r, scientists estimate】 t【hat it will take around 25 \years for the technology to be p\r】ofitable on 【a very large scale.1212Ad【dition\al\ so】urces\ •【 Edi/tor,\ Christele Ben Al\iShare this articleCopy/pas】te\ the /article video embed link below:CopyShareTweetSharese【ndShareTweetSharesendMo】reH\ideShar\eSe/ndShareShareShareSendShareS【h【areYou might also lik】\e \】 Could jellyfis】\【h be the a【nswer to fighting o/cean pol/l\ution? 【 】】 / / / / / Liquid windows and the energy-ef】ficient bu【ildin【gs of tomorrow \ More ab\outCarsFuelResearchEcologyEn【vironm\ental protecti/on/ \ Most viewed 【 What influence on climate is\ t\he corona】virus 】lock/down /really havi】n/g【? 】 / / 】 / The new AI system safeguarding 】pr\ema/ture babies \from infe【ction / \ Messen【ge/r RNA: the /molec\ule 【that\ may teach our 】bodie/s to beat cancer 【 / 【 \ 】 \ 】 Apple and Google【 say they&#;ll work togethe】r【 to trace spread of】 coronavirus via /sm】artph】o【nes【 / How EU funding is cha/n【ging the/ f【a【\】ce of Latvi/an innovation 】 / 【 】 Browse】\ to\da【y'】;s tagscI6T

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3sFwThe Eu/rop【ean Union 】h\as stepped i】n to help small /fi【】shing/ communities 】preserve/ their way of】 life, as y\oung people t\urn away from the job that their for】ebears 】d\id/ for generations.T【he Swedish-/speaking i【s】land commu/nity of Pellin/ki in southern Fi\nland is typical of those t/h【e EU 】is trying to hel/】p.For gen\erati】ons, fishing has been a respec/ted trade an】d a traditio/nal way of life for man/y famili/es. But today, t【he number of local fishers is dwindling. Only a few remain\.One r【e\ason is 】dec【l【/\ini【ng catch】es. The fishers blame an in】cr/easing number of 【predators: seals and cormorants \/】damage the c\age\s and dec】imat\e\ f\ish\/ 【stoc】ks.Good c\atches are no longer guaranteed, and t/\he\】 e】conomic surviv【【al of family-r】un fisheries is becoming increasing\ly uncer】tain.M\ost chil\dren from fi【shin\g families make 】a 】safer choice】 to/ leave/ home and study s【ometh【ing else.As their parents age and】 retire, small-sc/ale fisheries, once\ 【typical in Finland, \go ou【t /of busi/ness. Nationwide, the /numbe【【r of professional fishers ha】s decli\【ned in recent decades/ from 10 to aroun】d 400.【Twen】t/y-se\v】en-year-old Marie Kellgren has been fishing full-time fo/r m\or/e than four years, alt【hough she acknowl/edges that there are no】】t man\y like her."We&/rsquo;re \not m\any - young peop\le \fishing】. \I think 】it’s because it’s 【【physically hard wo【rk, and you don&rs【quo;t know for ho】w many years you c/an do \it. It's a bi【g risk to/ start."She in】itiall/y we【nt to stud】y t\ourism \in Helsink【i but then took up the op】por【tuni】ty of【 a local &ldq【uo;Master-【\【Apprentice" pr/og\ram to l【earn /t】he trade f\rom her /fat】her.\The】 EU-supported scheme provided a s\mall g】rant that allowed Marie to work for a year as an a/pprent】ice 】fisherwoman — without 】putting her fathe】r's business under any further fin】anci/a/l st【ra【in.My\ father 】is a fisherman, 【m\y father’s fat】her was 【a f【ish/erman, an【d my】 fathe】r's f【ather's father was\ a fisherman. /】 】 \ V】iking Kel\lgr/en 】 【 】 Her father, Viking, told Euronews: &ldq/uo;/】My fa\th【er is a fishe】rman, my 【father’s father w】as/\ a fi\sherman】, a\nd my father's f】at/h】er's \father was a\ fisherman. So M】arie/【 is the f【ifth gener】ation fishing here/."Th\e t\raining p/rogram included some th/eory an【d/ 】800 h】o】ur\s of fishing pra\ctice\."I lear】ned how to fish with nets and with trap\s, t/【o take care \of t】he fish, the catch, and to/ prepar\e, to 【salt a】nd to smoke and cold【-s】moke a\nd /make fishcake【s, and marke\tin【g, and all \o\ther st【uff about pay\ing 【b】\ills."The funding 【for the "Master-Ap【】p\rentice" pr\ogram wa【s pr\ovided main/ly by the Euro】pean Mar【itim【/e and Fishe】ri】es Fund, which supports generational rene/wal/】 in Europe's】 f/ishing sector. The idea came from \the local fishing comm\unity i\n Pellinki, when another aspir\ing fisherwoman, Tanja Åkerfelt, was struggling to enter the profess/ion."My fat/her didn&r【squo;t think th【at \was a 【go//od ide】a,” Tanja said. &ldq【uo;That&\rsquo;s when I had to 】talk to】 other fisher【m【en, won\de【r】in/g, how coul/d【 we do【 this.”O】ne /of the fishermen she【 sp/oke to was E】sko\ 】Taanila, who man】ages th/e pa/\rtnership /b【etw\een/ privat\e and public sto【ckhold】ers in】 the loc【al fisheries【【 se】ctor, kn【own as a FLAG &mdash】; Fis【heries Local Actio/n Group.Taanila came up with s/implified 】paperwork &mdash\; a formal【 contract and t/he 【tr\aining pr\og】ram\ for both the mas\t\er a/nd t【he\ appr\entice.Training a【 new 】fis【her costs around 6,000 e/ur/os. Esko says it's an ine【xpensive way to sustain【 professional fishing, which is the o】nly ye\ar-round econom】ic 【activity i/n the Pellinki are【a.T\h【e progr/am is helping to slo【\w the decli\ne of south\ern F/inland's fishing community — but/ it cannot reverse it.T【aanil\a 【said: &ldqu】o;Ever】y time 10 fis\hermen q【\uit, we get one or mos】tly two young peopl/e w\ho 】/are inte【re【sted in continuing."The progr【am has been running f【\or three years. Out of 15 app\rentices, 12 d【/ecided to \keep fishing professionally.That's a hi【gh succ【ess rat\e, but with the g/r】owing seal p】roblem and the fu】ture【 of fis/h s/to\cks uncer/tain,】 these/】 ef/for\ts might not be enough."We 】hav\e to get \new fisherme\n because/ the avera/ge age here is 60 years o/ld,&rdquo\; said Ta/an】il\a. &【ldquo;So if\ \we do nothing, 】it】 wi【ll】 //take only【 five or six years and everybody wil【l have quit. It is ve\ry important that\ we have a【 living fishery in【 ou/r coastal areas.】 Without tha/t,/ it c【ou\ld be a dead ar】ea. And that&\/rsquo;s not n【ic/e."Much furthe【r south, off the coast of the Belgian port of Ostend, the fishing 【tradition is thriving and u\【ndergoi/\ng/ a renewal.With its limite【】d coas\tline【 an/d only six d\oze【n\ fishing vessels, Belgium is\n't a big fi【\shing】 country /—】 but in coastal 【West Flanders/ province, f【ishing tradi】t/ionally played an importan【t role.A lo/cal maritime \scho\ol &ndash【; the Maritie【m\ Instituut Mercator – runs\】 a ded/icated training ship, \wh【ich was renovated with EU he\lp.Built\ in 1967/, the "Br【o\odwinner", /a beam tra/wler, was refi/tted to provide bett】er safety and a gr/eater level of comfort than on t\raditional】 ve\】ssels.Bart DeWae/gen\ar/e, \a teacher at/ t【he Maritiem】 Insti/tuut Mercat\or, said s】tudents get\ esse\ntia/l hands-【【on training. Most of th/em d\on't have the se【a in their blood."I 【think maybe 20 per】 ce\nt are from】 familie/s that did it bef】ore, and 80【 per cent don’t【 even know anything about it. The】\y come/ from big /cities lik【e Antwe/rp and 【B\russels, no\th】】i【ng to do\ with t【he s\ea.&rdq】uo;Stud【ent/s go on eight-hour f/ishing trip】s sta【rting \fro【m the age of 12. By\ 16, 】t】hey spend】 hal】f 】o】f th/eir school ti】m】e at sea.Along with var/ious f/ishing-related skills, they learn navigati/on and marine engineerin【g.Most are /seeking a job in the maritime\ sector,】 but not necessarily in the fis/hing industry, 】where the work is har/d and the/ risk of accidents high./Sami \Tebbouche\, a student, said: "Y】ou 】have to learn to sail the vessel on your own】. You have to wa【ke up at night to repair \t\he net/s. It's tough!"Another student, Seppe DeKinde】r, said the unpredictable n】ature of th】e job】 puts many young 【people off. Fishermen's salaries can be ver/【y high - or low, depe】nding on the catch."It&r【squo;s unp\redictable ho【w much】 you ca【/n earn\ sometimes. That&/rsqu\o;s why a lot 【of p】eople are uncerta【in i\f\ they rea/lly/ want to do it/】. And /also becau【se it’s really h】ard wo】rk. And a【 lot 【of p【eople \have k】i/d\s a/nd stuff, and they don&rsq/】uo;t want to【 leave them behind."\In the 1980s, five vo/cati\o\nal】 sch【ools【 】tr\ained 3【00 pupils a /year to wo】rk in fisheries. Today, only o\ne【 【sch】ool wit【h 40 students 【remains.Teache/rs say /that in the modern era, even high salar】ies and improved【 【/working conditions are n】ot enough to /ma【ke fishing attractive for【 yo【ung peopl】e.The scho【\o/l’s headmaster Jac【ki/e Scherrens said: "I\n th】e /p【ast, when they/ 】were, for example, two weeks at se】a, three days in the 】harbour, but from the th【ree da【/ys yo】u had 】to work】 two \days, and that was no problem. Now, when they a/【re, let&rsquo\;s say, /e/ight day】/s a】t sea, 【four days in /h】arbour, and/ you ha】ve to work one【 or two \days/ &m/d】【ash; they don\&\】rsquo;t wan【t that anymore! S/o it&rsquo\;s【 very difficult【 to attract you\n【g people for it."There /\are hopes th【at/\ si】x new vessels about to】 enter the Be/lgian fis】hing【 fleet will revive interest i\n the profession.1212121【】2121212121Shar\e this a【rticleCopy/pas\te the a/rticle video embed link below:CopyShareTw/eetS】【】】har】esendShareTweetShar】esendMoreHide【ShareSendShareShareShareSendSha】reSha\reYou/ might also l/ike 】 【 /\ The importance of re【sto】ring ma/rine【 b/iodiv】ersi】ty \ 【 M\o/re a【boutFishery/YouthOceanEnvironmental【 protection/ 】Most viewed /\ 【 \ / 【 What i【nfluence on climate is 】the coronavirus lockd\own rea\lly having? 】\/ 】 The new AI system safeguar\ding premature babies from infecti【on \ \ 】 / 】 Mes【sen\ger RNA: the molec\】ule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 【 / 【 【 Apple and Google say t/hey'/;l\l work together /to t】ra/ce spread of //【c\or\onavirus via s】martphones How EU fundin\g is/ cha/nging \the face of Latvian innovation 】 【 【Brows】e today's【 tagsxZTX

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i4W8For 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sckbs

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